Give them the skills and time and they can succeed

pediatric profiler pictureI have a colleague in the National Speakers Association who has C4-5 quadriplegia. He has an active speaking career, traveling around the country on his own.  He has had to learn many strategies in order to be independent.  It was not fast or easy.

He filmed himself doing the task of undressing (not to the explicit level so still rated G) to point out what allowing individuals the time and skills could allow them to achieve.

This is a message I would like all of you to consider as you work with your children or your students and feel that time has run out and you can no longer provide the time to get them to the mastery level of a task.  Many of these children can already complete the task but need more time to use their cognitive skills to figure it out.

Here is Chad’s YouTube video.  Let me know what you think.

 

Siblings Impacted By Disabilities Too, Study Finds – Disability Scoop

See on Scoop.itDevelopmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children

Siblings of children with disabilities are more likely than those with typically developing brothers or sisters to struggle with relationships, schoolwork, behavior and leisure time.

Dr. Pat McGuire‘s insight:

Do you have a child with disabilities?  Does he or she have typically developing siblings?  Then this is an important article for you.

Raising a child with disabilities is hard.  It takes up large blocks of time in your day.  This then results in less time to notice, interact, and emotionaly be there for your other children.  This doesn’t mean that you are a bad parent. You Aren’t!

What it means is that we have got to find a way as a community, to help the typically developing siblings find their own sense of belonging, of being noticed, and appreciated. There need to be more programs for children with siblings with disabilities that provides an outlook for them to express both what they love about their sibling and parents and what they find unfair. There need to be outlets for parents to be able to be with their typically developing children while someone reliable cares for the child with disabilities.

If you are a parent of a child with disabilities and typically developing children, what are some of your wishes so that your typically developing child can truly feel your love and caring?

See on www.disabilityscoop.com

Dropout Indicators Found for 1st Graders

See on Scoop.itDevelopmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children

Researchers in Montgomery County, Md., have identified warning signals, such as poor grades or a high number of absences, that can flag students as early as 1st grade who are likely to drop out later.

Dr. Pat McGuire‘s insight:

This could be the start of a means of getting ahead of the fallouts.  As schools can be able to identify the at risk students, they can begin to change how they work with them, that targets the skills they need to close their gaps (language, academic, behavioral) so that they will become a statistic of success rather than a statistic of loss.

This is one of the main reasons why I speak around the country about understanding and working with children experiencing developmental and behavioral challenges. As schools can understand and develop effective methods of intervention before the gap widens, all children will learn better.

See on www.edweek.org

Clinical research: Eye problems common in autism — SFARI.org – Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative

See on Scoop.itDevelopmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children

Dr. Pat McGuire‘s insight:

This is an important article that highlights concerns that parents of children with autism have brought up frequently.  I wonder if the children who look at things sideways have the unequal acuity between eyes that they mention?  I know that I have uneven acuity (astigmatism in one eye and near sighted in the other to a different degree) and I find myself closing one eye depending on what I am focusing on.

I think it is important for children with autism to have an eye exam from a pediatric phthamologist who has experience working with children with special needs in order to get this looked at.

See on sfari.org

Want to understand why some children are hard to deal with?

different yet beautiful

different yet beautiful

I am excited to offer my first free report, O.D.D. Not What You Think. I highlight why some children struggle with compliance despite the fact that all children are born wanting to be loved, accepted, and respected.

This report is the beginning my new project, Parenting Challenging Children.  I am putting together a member site with monthly webinars directed at understanding the 6 neurodevelopmental disorders of 1) Intellectual Disorders, 2) Communication Disorders, 3) Autism Spectrum Disorders, 4) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), 5) Learning Disorders, and 6)Motor Disorders. There will also be webinars providing knowledge and strategies for working with mental health problems that up to 20% of children/youth experience. Temperament will be highlighted on its own and in conjunction with the neurodevelopmental and mental health issues of our young.

I am excited to be at a time and place to be able to share this knowledge and strategies that many families, schools, and other organizations/agencies that work with these struggling youth.  I will update you as the different levels of training are available.

 

Lack of corpus callosum yields insights into autism —

See on Scoop.itDevelopmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children

Dr. Pat McGuire‘s insight:

Having known patients with this condition, it is extremely hard for them to make sense of the world around them.  But the hardest part is to help others understand what is happening, since there are no outward signs of this anatomical deficit. They are another group of children and adolescents with developmental and behavioral challenges who I try to be a voice for.

Want a copy of me free report on oppositional children? Click here.

See on sfari.org

8 Facts About Autism the Media Is Not Covering | Let’s Chat Autism

See on Scoop.itDevelopmental & Behavioral Challenges in Children

Dr. Pat McGuire‘s insight:

This is an important article to share as we get close to Autism Awareness Day April 2nd.  What Ms. Peete brings up is so important.

Remember to pass this on.

See on www.letschatautism.com